NYD double & a chance for parkrun tourism – Traralgon & Churchill parkruns

As New Year’s day is the only day you can officially run two parkruns, I had been eagerly checking the compendium to find out which parkruns would be offering this opportunity and crossing my fingers for two I hadn’t already done. Luckily, two popped up in Gippsland and, making the most of the school holidays, I booked some accommodation to make the most of it.

20190101_074130.jpg

On the way to the start area at Traralgon parkrun

Our first parkrun of the day was Traralgon so this is where we chose to stay the night – definitely a quiet New Year’s Eve when you have to be up early to run the next morning! We easily found the start line for Traralgon and gathered for briefing. It was great to see everyone beaming with enthusiasm at the New Year with many locals and visitors sharing the morning. This was a special morning in another way – my Dad had joined us to spectate his first New Year’s day double and it was great to have him there.

20190101_083109_001.jpg

The view from the turnaround point of the Traralgon parkrun course

Traralgon is a double out and back course along a winding path along the river and through a suburban park with views across to the far off mountains. The beauty of this is that each leg doesn’t feel that long and you are always out there with others, receiving smiles and encouragement. The sun was starting to get a bit of bite so was pleased to get through this one relatively quickly, knowing we had more to go.

And with that, parkrun #1 for the day was done so we waved goodbye and headed south for Churchill parkrun.

20190101_092450.jpg

Trying to get my head around the course 🙂

We arrived in plenty of time and easily found where we needed to be as there were lots of people gathering – those from both Traralgon and Newborough as well as those sticking to the one parkrun at Churchill. The meeting point is at the hub which is the perfect spot with toilets and shade – both of which were needed having already been for a run.

The Churchill course is another double out and back…sort of. It sounded a bit confusing on the directions but was actually really easy to follow once you set out and didn’t feel like you were covering the same ground. The track winds through the trees, along boardwalks and over bridges and includes a couple of inclines just to keep it varied. I really liked this course – not only for the opportunity to see and encourage others but also for the scenery and tranquil trail.

20190101_101637.jpg

20190101_101934.jpg

There was a definitely community vibe at both events and the finish area of Churchill exemplified this with lots of people hanging around to cheer others in and chat, generally enjoying each other’s company and kicking the New Year off in the best way possible.

Thanks to both event teams – it’s a big job to volunteer any day but especially for special events and I really appreciated the opportunity to tourist at these great events to start 2019.

20190101_091328.jpg

Starting the year with a slice of gratitude

I’m starting 2019 with a grumbling achilles which was not in my plans at all. Last night’s walk around the neighbourhood was a slightly grumpy one as I wallowed in the fact I can’t run right now. I’m pleased to say that this morning’s walk had a completely different tone – wallowing done, I had a wonderful walk and spent the 5km thinking of all the things I’m grateful for as I start this new year:

  • I can walk. And walking is great, especially as I don’t have to think about where my feet are landing, how I can barely breathe and which bits might be chafing randomly so I can actually just enjoy the scenery instead.
  • This is not a permanent injury – I will run again soon and I’ll get that lovely surge of gratitude for being back at it. And get to again whinge about having to think about where my feet are landing, how I can barely breathe and which bits might be chafing randomly.
  • I love where I live. I have the choice of so many great places outdoors to enjoy the environment, all within a short walk or drive from my house. I have wetlands on my doorstep, beautiful hills visible from my backyard and a glorious beaches a short drive away.
  • I now have a running husband who is also experiencing his own injuries so he (finally) gets it and we’re able to support each other.
  • I’m part of a fantastic offline and online running community who are listen to me grumble about my injuries and help me put it all back into perspective.
  • The shuffle algorithm on my phone this morning was perfect – every song was exactly what I needed to hear and had me smiling all the way around my walk.
  • I have some great events to look forward to this year – new experiences and new goals to tick off.

Here’s to a 2019 filled with gratitude and, hopefully, some running as well.

IMG_20181020_112511_329.jpg

 

Looking back and looking forward

I swear the end of the year has snuck up on me this time around and I really can’t believe it’s already the end of December. Strava reminded me with their annual funky video that it was time to reflect on my running so here it is!

strava

I snuck over the 1000km mark in my running which I was happy about – less than last year but still feels like a lofty enough amount and something I wouldn’t have dreamed of a few years ago.

It has been quite an interesting year of running and one in which I’ve certainly encountered struggles. Completing the Dopey challenge in January with my first marathon was both an incredible way to kick off the year and a difficult one. After that, all goals seemed lacking and I found motivation hard to come by. I convinced myself to ‘just keep running’ and hoped my mojo would return which it did yet it really ebbed and flowed all year.

I had a couple of setbacks which were tough at the time (including 6 weeks out with a sprained ankle) but which made me appreciate being able to run when I was able to. The hardest things to push through have been the mental barriers – quite a challenge that running helps me keep my brain and moods balanced and yet is also sometimes the cause of the imbalance in the first place. I started then gave up training for my second marathon, deciding I just wasn’t ready to give it the time and energy it deserved. Yet.

Losing my Mum halfway through the year coloured everything including my running in both hard and wonderful ways. I’ve learnt that grief just does its thing and takes over when it wants to, sometimes leaving me unable to get out the door to run. And then other times, I wanted to run because I knew Mum would have liked that. It was funny that she was never a runner and it wasn’t something that played any role in her life but it had become something we talked a lot about in the last few years so I connect her with it and I know she was proud of what I’d achieved.

This all seems a bit flat but there are many things I’m hugely proud of this year – here are my highlights:

  • Completing the Dopey challenge and my first marathon. Seriously nothing has ever (and probably will ever) compare to that. I still get goosebumps thinking about it and it’s the thing that gets me through all tough things ever since – if I can run a marathon, I can do anything.
    wp-1515407369605..jpg
  • Finishing the Surf Coast Trail half marathon. It was the second time I’d attempted this beast but did it on my own this time, fighting both the demons in my head and those in my body as I left my stomach contents on the trail. Several times. So many reasons to give up and yet I just kept going. I can do hard things.
    20180630_124622.jpg
  • City2Surf. My second go at this event too but just as much fun as the first, if not more so. I loved having my husband there to share the weekend and a PB topped it off delightfully.
    20180812_103414.jpg
  • Barossa Brave half marathon. Every now and then, I like to do something that scares me, just to see if I can. And this scared me with its big hill in the middle and the thought of doing 3 loops of it. Without my usual running buddies. I loved absolutely every minute and smiled so much my face hurt.
    20181020_103505.jpg
  • Portland Winter Solstice Run. This was another one where I proved to myself that I can do hard things. I could have stayed in bed and listened to the wind and rain but instead I sucked it up and ran in all that the weather could throw at us. And loved it.
    IMG_20180617_192629_578.jpg
  • My running friends. I spend so much time running alone but, whether they’re with me in person or in spirit, they’re always there and always offering encouragement and understanding without judgment. When I am lucky enough to run with them in person, the kilometres fly and we solve the problems of the world. I wouldn’t have been able to complete Dopey without them and cannot stress enough what a better place my world is for having them in it. Some are in this picture but I extend this to my wider running family, some of which I only catch up with occassionally at far off parkuns but who still have a significant impact. As do those I’ve only met online in the two running groups that are a big part of my running life – their constant encouragement and advice boost me up.
    img_0460

So that’s my year. 1001.8km. 1 marathon and 4 half marathons. 34 parkruns plus another 8 as a volunteer. 11 more medals to add to my bling collection. And a whole lot of new and precious memories to add to the store. On reflection, I’m feeling very blessed and grateful for what the year has brought, despite any hardships. It all balances out in the end and the dips really do make you appreciate the heights. Looking forward to what 2019 will bring!

parkrun tourism @ eastern gardens

I must say, I have quite liked having my NENDY (nearest event not done yet) for parkrun a mere 22km away. There was something reassuring about knowing that I had the potential to do a new event at any time I wanted without worrying about accommodation or working out whether it was driveable in the early hours of a Saturday morning. In fact, we’d considered leaving Eastern Gardens parkrun as our last event in Victoria but, in need of a change, we ventured there this morning instead.

I tried really hard to see this one through tourist eyes but it’s hard – firstly, I know the course very, very well and secondly, I know many of the team behind it (all fabulous!). So forgive my familiarity. Eastern Gardens parkrun takes place very near Eastern Beach on Geelong’s beautiful waterfront. It really is an ideal spot for a parkrun – a gorgeous park with a wide track, ample parking, toilet facilities, a shelter for rainy briefings and a stone’s throw from the water for a post-run dip. Tick, tick, tick!

20171123_185932.jpg

Eastern Gardens course is a very easy to follow out and back with an added shorter out and back to make up the distance. While it’s easy to follow and the track is easy to run on, the hills make it not a particularly easy run. They’re those sneaky hills which don’t really look like hills until you try to run them and they then feel very much like hills. Being incredibly familiar with this course, I knew what to expect but it didn’t help – they were a challenge, particularly in this morning’s humidity. However having a couple of out and back bits does mean there are lots of opportunities for cheering others on and receiving encouragement, all of which were flowing this morning.

Another benefit of this course is the ample selection of cafes for post-parkrun breakfast – the team generally meet at Winifreds which I can highly recommend. Or meander along the waterfront for coffee or ice cream (or both!).

And now I’m back to having a far away NENDY and facing the prospect of a long drive to tick off another parkrun – such a tough life! I suspect it will be a looooong time until we tick off all Victorian parkruns and I’m ok with that – I’m enjoying sampling them slowly. Although, with a New Year’s double coming up, maybe not that slowly at the moment 🙂

20171104_060741.jpg

Four Vines Running Festival half marathon – race recap

Those who follow this blog may recall that, ages ago, I signed up for a marathon. It was going to be this delightful event in country Victoria and I was planning on seeing how I went with ‘just’ a marathon (as opposed to a Dopey challenge). About 2/3 into my marathon training, I realised I really didn’t have it in me (just yet) and pulled back to the half.

Husband and I rocked up to the start line this morning, bright and early and with absolutely perfect running weather greeting us – blue skies and crisp air. Being the first time this event had run, as well as being out of the way for most participants, it was a smaller crowd gathering at the start. The start line for most of the events, including the half marathon, was at Tahbilk Winery, just outside of Nagambie and what an incredibly scenic start to the day. We wandered around, took some photos amidst the vines, took advantage of the portaloos (with no queues!) and got ready.

Husband waved me off (he was running the 10km later in the morning) as the small crowd set off on the half. I had known this would be a smaller event and had fully expected to be last as is usually the case. What I hadn’t expected was how inclusive this event was – they had thought of everything and had a tail runner for the half. So my headphones came out and I chatted to 2 delightful runners who happily hung out with me at the back.

The course headed out along a track and then onto the road where it spent quite a bit of time. While it wasn’t a closed road, there was minimal traffic and the cars that did come through were slow, careful and, usually, full of people willing and ready to cheer us on our way. The road was also canopied with trees which was very welcome as the sun was rising and making its presence felt.

Soon we caught up to another runner who joined our merry band and my 30/30 intervals as we headed off to our second winery of the morning – Michelton Wines. We had a brief bit of confusion about which entrance to go in but, once we’d worked it out, we were rewarded with some loops through the vines and more beautiful scenery.

And then we were on our way back along the road where we caught up with another runner to add to our group. We had a final few kilometres to run back in Tahbilk amongst more vines – probably the hardest part of the course for me as I resorted to a power walk and tried to ignore my blisters.

The last stretch felt like forever but it wasn’t that long before the finish line crept up and I ran across it, being rewarded with my medal and a wine. Husband and I then sat around, soaking up the beautiful weather, the entertainment and a beverage while resting our legs before reluctantly bidding farewell for our drive home. I wish I was one of those people who has a really long weekend this weekend but sadly not. 🙁

Absolutely loved this event – it far exceeded my expectations. It’s hard to know how an event will go on its first run but Four Vines just got everything right – enough aid stations, really friendly volunteers, great facilities, perfect event village and vibe and even friendly competitors who all cheered each other on, regardless of distance or pace. And, sealing it for me was the fabulous group of women I got to run with this morning – such an encouraging and supportive tribe who made the time and kilometres fly. Thanks to them and to Four Vines, we’ll definitely be back!

Barossa Brave half marathon – race recap

I didn’t seek out this little half marathon, it found me. After our Dopey challenge, I’d been looking for an event to stretch me and had found a marathon in the beautiful Barossa Valley. Even better, we found cheap flights from our local airport and locked it all in. And then the company that was organising the marathon cancelled the event. I have a lot to say about that but, rather than go into details, I have just learnt not to trust that they’re going to actually run events that they allow you to register for so won’t be bothering with their offerings in other places.

However all was not lost – the fabulous organiser of South Australia’s ‘Coastal fun runs’ stepped in and organised a smaller, charity event in its place and I signed up for that instead.

And so it was that I found myself meeting a bunch of other eager runners at Bethany Reserve in the Barossa Valley on Saturday morning. The distances on offer were a marathon, half marathon, 14km and 7km and I’d opted for the half. There were about 100 runners in the event and it had such a warm, friendly, local vibe to it. Even the huntsman who joined me in the toilet pre-departure seemed friendly and welcoming. Possibly a little too welcoming.

We all gathered at the start line, had a group picture taken and set off. The course was a 7km loop running out from the reserve, along a vineyard and a road before taking us on a creek crossing (dry but fun) and then out along an out and back arm which had a bit of an incline. And then it was time for the main event – the hill in the middle of the loop which rewarded us for the climb with spectacular views over the Barossa. And then it was down the hill, along the out and back arm again and back to the reserve…..to do it all again.

I had known from the start that this was going to be tough because of the hills but the pressure had been taken away by the very generous cut off time allowed. So I was measuring this one by how much enjoyment I could get out of it – a smile PB, not a time one. It wasn’t hard to achieve – what a glorious course on a glorious day with a glorious crowd. The hills were challenging as were the surfaces – longish grass and rutted dirt on some bits, rocks and cow pats hidden in grass on others and the always fun dry creek bed to navigate. The views were ample distraction – vineyards and farmland wherever you looked and the odd cow to say hello to. We even had gates to go through (others climbed the stiles but there was no way my legs would sign up for that so I got used to opening and closing gates). The weather was perfect – crisp and a little cloudy at the start while we warmed up then brilliant blue sky and sunshine by the last lap to bring it home. Magnificent.

Due to the loop and the out and back sections, we also all got to know each and there were lots and lots of smiles, high fives and encouragement from those completing all distances. Whenever I found it hard going, I remembered that, while I was doing the big hill 3 times, the marathoners had to do it 6 times and I couldn’t fathom how much my glutes would be screaming if that were me. So I smiled as I plodded my way up.

Husband had dropped me off then gone to parkrun and made it back in time for me to start my final lap. I definitely was plodding up the hill on that one but was still doing it with a smile – so grateful to be there and was as mentally strong as ever. My physical fitness might not quite have been keeping up with what I wanted but my mind was strong – there was no point where I felt like giving up or that it was too hard. Husband joined me for the last bit and I managed to run across the finish line to lots of applause from the crowd who were enjoying their post run wines.

What an event! Well organised, contributing to charities, a beautiful course with enough challenge to keep us amused and a great crowd of volunteers and fellow runners. Besides, any event where you’re standing at the finish with your medal and a glass of wine has to be a good thing.

My Polar Dream – book review

I first came across Jade Hameister‘s story at the National Young Leaders’ Day in Melbourne last year. On a day full of inspirational speakers, she stood out and captivated both the young people and adults in the audience. At the age of 14, she became the youngest person to ski to the North Pole from outside 89 degrees. At 15, she was standing on a stage in front of a few thousand people, recounting her adventures, filling us in on her future plans and sending a very clear message – young people and, specifically, young women can achieve great things. In particular, her #bravenotperfect message struck a chord with the 4 school captains I was with and it was something we talked about and took back to our classroom.

Later that year, her adventures continued with a trek across Greenland and, earlier this year, with a trek to the South Pole, allowing her to claim the ‘polar hat trick’ and become the youngest person to do so (amongst many other ‘firsts’).

View this post on Instagram

do not go gentle into that goodnight

A post shared by Jade Hameister (@jadehameister) on

Having followed her journey via Instagram, I was keen to read the book of her adventures, released recently.

My Polar Dream‘ is a very easy read but definitely not lightweight, especially when you pause to consider the enormity of Jade’s achievements and what it took for her to get there. She is very lucky to have had supportive parents and the means to undertake such treks but neither of those factors lessen what she accomplished. To train for and complete such lofty goals (while also getting on with the business of being a teenager) tells a lot about her character and mental strength.

The book takes you through the 3 journeys and gives you insights into her days on the ice with nothing off limits. There’s discussion about her difficulties with finding appropriate places and conditions to go to the toilet and how it felt to be sharing time and a tent with Dad – probably not something I could have done for that long at that age. Jade also ensures she tells it how it was – not all sunshine and butterflies. It was hard, as if that word could possible describe the enormity of exactly how challenging it was. There were tears and parts where less resilient people would have given up but she is made of much tougher stuff and focused on achieving her goal.

Most of all, Jade’s personality and character really shine through. She is such a positive role model for other young women in an era where there is so much superficiality and focus on how people look on the outside, rather than who they are on the inside. The story of how she handled some internet trolls is particularly telling.

My Polar Dream‘ is definitely worth a read, whether you ever intend to embark on a polar trek of your own or not. And Jade’s TEDx talk is also worth watching and sharing for its powerful message – “What if the focus shifted from how we appear to the possibilities of what we can do?